Tag Archives: gameOfThrones

AGoT Catelyn 11

This chapter introduces Brynden’s refusal to marry. If said refusal is the only grounds for believing Brynden to be gay (as it seems to be), I’m not buying it. Marriage in Brynden’s social milieu need have nothing to do with sexual desire: noblemen can and do marry for political advantage and to produce heirs, while having sex on the side with people (including, in Renly’s case at least, male people) they’re more attracted to. Lack of attraction to women would be no reason to refuse marriage; indeed, marriage to a sexually undemanding woman would provide much more effective cover than conspicuous refusal to marry. Faithfulness to an unattainable woman, like Hoster’s wife, seems more plausible, but couldn’t it be that the guy just doesn’t want to be tied down?

But, “Walder Frey … any of three, he said…” Hilarious.

Also in this chapter:

  • The titular phrase again, from Stevron Frey.
  • Catelyn: “We went to war when Lannister armies were ravaging the Riverlands…” Yes, because of YOUR actions! And now you want peace! Sheesh.

 


AGoT Eddard 15

Here comes some backstory about the tournament at Harrenhall:

  • Ned was eighteen.
  • Brandon was present.
  • Robert fought well (if “berserk”ly) in the melee.
  • Jaime was inducted into the Kingsguard.
  • Rhaegar won the joust, and gave his favor to Lyanna instead of his wife.

Elsewhere in this chapter:

  • Two more mentions of the titular phrase: Ned once again repeating Cersei’s words in his head; and Varys, in a populist usage reminiscent of Jorah’s.
  • Ned still dwells on how he “failed” Robert. Come on, Ned, has it never yet occurred to you that it’s the other way around?
  • The “scarecrow” of a gaoler (the one that isn’t Varys) reminds me of a passage I just heard in the audiobook of Roger Zelazny’s The Hand of Oberon: Zelazny puts himself in the book as a cadaverous, novel-writing dungeon guard. I doubt GRRM could be mistaken for a scarecrow, though.
  • “Catelyn held [Cersei’s] brother; [Cersei] dare not kill [Ned] or the Imp’s life would be forfeit as well.” Really, would Cersei care about Tyrion’s life? (Not according to Varys a few paragraphs later.)
  • “There is no creature on earth half so terrifying as a truly just man.” I dunno, Stannis (the subject of this little speech) hasn’t been all that terrifying. Daenerys has perpetrated some (mostly unintentional) terror in the name of justice. But the most terrifying characters so far (Gregor, Ramsay et al.) have nothing to do with justice.
  • “…or he could bring you Sansa’s head.” Gorgeous, chilling writing.

AGoT Eddard 13

Boros Blount, Preston Greenfield, and Barristan Selmy are explicitly compared to the three knights at the Tower of Joy. Presumably only Selmy resembles the stylized, archetypal knights of Ned’s fever dream. (I say presumably because I’m not sure about Greenfield: if the books ever tell us anything of note about him, I don’t remember it.)

That fever dream left me with the feeling that Ned believes, sometimes and on some levels, that he should not have survived the encounter at the tower. Are the present “three men in white cloaks” ghosts come to take the life that he got to keep only by mistake, as Jaqen H’gar will later take three lives in recompense for the three Arya prolongs?

Then Robert becomes Lyanna: “Promise me, Ned.” Will we eventually find out that Lyanna’s demand was as mundane as “eat the pig that killed me?” I somehow doubt it. Now the three knights look more like a debased mirror of the past: noble knights and noble promises replaced by base and shallow ones. But if that were the idea being communicated, it would have been more effective to use a third lesser knight in Selmy’s place.

On reread, the irony in this chapter is nearly unbearable: “His regency would be a short one.” “[S]harp as the difference between right and wrong, between true and false, between life and death” — even the last being, in this world, not a very sharp distinction at all.

Miscellanea from this chapter:

  • Third occurrence of the phrase game of thrones, in Ned’s head as a memory of Cersei saying it.
  • Ned continues to perceive Tomard, the overweight commoner, as a real and valuable human being.

AGoT Eddard 12 – more spoilery than usual

Ah, the irony: Ned will someday tell Sansa how helpful(!) she was to him this day. Varys is “worse” than Littlefinger because he “[does] too little.” (Yeah, what was he thinking prepping only three or four Targaryen heirs?) Jon Arryn died “for the truth” (although Ned is finally right about Bran almost-dying for it).

I forgot that Sandor is now technically lord of Cleganeland, or whatever it may be called.

To Ned, the guardsman Tomard isn’t laughable “Fat Tom,” but a sensible and trustworthy supporter.

This chapter is probably Cersei’s sympathetic peak.

“What would Catelyn do, if it were Jon’s life, against the children of her body?” Is that some kinda foreshadowing?

Ned, still snarky!

Second use of the titular phrase, by Cersei.


AGoT Daenerys 3

  • “Viserys still struggled with the short stirrups and the flat saddle:” this line reminds me of a horse book I read as a kid (unfortunately don’t remember which one) which discussed how the Moors’ simple saddles and short stirrups gave them a maneuverability advantage over fully armored European crusader knights, whose saddles were essentially chairs from which they had little ability to move. I can practically see the book’s pencil illustrations in my head.
  • We learn more about Jorah’s appearance: in addition to being middle-aged, balding, and robustly built, he is “not handsome” and has extensive body hair.
  • Jorah also makes the first use (I think) of the phrase game of thrones, in the context of raising Dany’s consciousness of the poor and their lack of interest in who rules them, so long as said ruler isn’t making their lives any harder than they otherwise would be.
  • There’s another foreshadowing dream, associating dragons with birth imagery and depicting a self-immolating Dany.
  • There are Targaryen lemurs in Qohor!
  • Daenerys and the handmaids talk about dragons while in the bath – the ultimate inspiration for the Viserys/Doreah sexposition scene in the TV show?
  • What is known: dragons are evil. The moon is a goddess, wife of the sun.
  • Dany is now fourteen.